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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
to focus its foreign policy effort on issue. former ambassador to iraq chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professo
and also on foreign policy, how that is playing out. guest: let's -- there is no doubt the president had a pretty substantially on foreign policy in the polls that have been done. that lead has narrowed in the polls a look at just last week on the foreign policy question. i think that the benghazi issue has played a significant role in that decline. i think on benghazi, it is hard to say how that will play out politically. i do think the administration has a lot to answer for, objectively, for how it handled and what the president and vice- president or did not know any time and how they responded. we do not a time to get into the details of that. typically that would not be decisive. i do not think -- is truly on political terms, not to go into the more question the caller raised, and political terms is not likely to be decisive. it is not something helpful to the president'. it will likely not decide the election, but is still in the polls largely about the economy. host: jonathan martin -- a few days ago in politico.com i.p. writes that republicans are genuinely intrigued and the pros
for china policy and what we can do for foreign policy in general. it will validator system, give us the resources we need. and if we do that, not only the energy, but were way ahead of technology the demographic savers. with the best university, r&d, entrepreneurial spirit and the political system. but we've got to get through this immediate polarization. best overall going to be thinking about next tuesday on the path of fiscal cliff, but the trifecta and stimulating sharpish growth, getting on top of our debt problem and investing in the future all at the same time. i think we can do it. if we can, there's no reason to talk about american decline. >> i want students, friends, faculty, we are going to put a mic in the center aisle if you can start thinking of questions, just line up at the night. i don't own how many will take. as your thinking a lot to ask your guests one of the questions about the future, which is many ways every administration is tested, not by the things they plan to do, but the things that happen they didn't expect, the surprises. the question for all of you i
and republican presidential hopeful mitt romney debated issues of foreign policy and the economy, we turn to world-renowned political dissident, linguist, author, and mit professor noam chomsky. in a recent speech, professor chomsky examined topics largely ignored or glossed over during the campaign -- from china to the arab spring, to global warming and the nuclear threat posed by israel versus iran. he spoke last month at the university of massachusetts in amherst, at any event sponsored by the center for popular economics. his talk was entitled, "who owns the world?" >> when i was thinking about these remarks, i had two topics in mind. i could not decide between them. pretty obvious ones. one topic is, what are the most important issues that we face? the second topic is, what issues are not being treated seriously or at all in the quadrennial frenzy now under way called in election? but i realize that there is no problem. it is not a hard choice. they are the same topic. there are reasons for it, which are very significant in and of themselves. i would like to return to that in a momen
." >> this is on foreign policy. the american ambassador to libya was recently killed. syria has defended -- descended into civil war. united states sends hundreds of billions of dollars in federal aid to countries around the world democracies and dictators. what should be the basic guiding principles of american foreign policies? >> fundamentally, i would have to say that freedom is something we need to encourage across the world. that me talk about christopher's stevens and what happened. his death along with three others is a tragedy, and that has been in a lot of people's thoughts and prayers. we need to get to the bottom of that, and i'm not here to speculate on who did what, but we need to find out and the american people need to know. i hope it will be transparent and can be clear so, two things will come out of it. people need to be held accountable, but also we can learn from that, so in the future if we have diplomats abroad we can ensure we are protecting them. as it relates to other countries, and there is turmoil in the middle east, from my perspective, that is one thing that we have don
and what we can do for our foreign policy and. we are way ahead of everyone, including china. we have the best universities. we have entrepreneurialism spirits. we have a political system. i will take us over china and others. we're all gonna be thinking about the polarization next tuesday. we have the trifecta of stimulating the sluggish growth, getting on top of our debt problems, and investing in our future of the same time. i think we can do it. if we can, there is no reason to talk about american decline. >> i want the students, friends, faculty, please start thinking about questions. linocut the microphone. i do not know how many we will take because of time constraints. i want to ask our guests one other question about the future. in many ways, every administration is tested not by the things that they plan to do, but to the things that happened that they did not expect. the surprises. i guess the question for all of you looking to the future is what do you think will be the surprise for the next administration in asia? we will start with chris and work our way back. >> the qui
, on this issue generally in foreign policy, how is that playing out in pennsylvania? guest: there is no doubt that the president had a pretty substantial lead on foreign policy in the polls that have been done. that lead has certainly narrowed to four, five, six points in the polls i looked at just last week. the been gauzy issue has certainly played a pretty significant role in that decline. on been gauzy, it's hard to say exactly how that would play a politically. i do think the administration has a lot to answer for objectively for how they handled it and what the president and vice-president new or did not know when any time and how they responded to the request for security. we do not have time to get in the details of that. typically that would not be decisive. we will not go to the moral question that the caller raised, but in political terms, it's not likely to be decisive, but it's certainly not helpful to the president. it is still in the polls that i have done and others have done largely about the economy. host: this was just a few days ago from politicio. republicans are intrigue
administration to focus its foreign policy efforts on asia. former ambassador to iraq, chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy object is an asian policy is a good place to rebuild bipartisanship. the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon and welcome to gaston on georgetown company country university. we've kind for a special conversation. a conversation between top diplomats past and present, each of whom has played a significant role over the past two decades with representatives from the administration of george h.w. bush to the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offered their expertise and experience as they look back on their years of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. we offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school foreign service and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our country's most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to dr. dr. victor cha and director of asian studi
and not the modern culture that feels idaho with dairy cows. we need agriculture policy and foreign policy that fits her to her family farms here in new york. and that's what i'll absolutely be focused on. what i've have spoken to farmers around the district, they're not looking for special treatment, that they want to be treated fairly, not be subjected to unfair competition from the big guys out there in the midwest. >> moderator: congressman gibson, 45 seconds on the farm bill. gibson: he's been tracking it all along. i've been very involved in the process. i've got many amendments into the bill. i'm very proud to say with a dairy security there. dairy farmers are now not even cover the cost of production were going to fix that with the martian were putting in there. i've worked with once a shoe from red hook, beginning farmer leader to make sure we inspire new generations to come to the farm and talk about grants and loans and conservation programs. i am proud to say of the friend of the farmer from the farm bureau and even the pharmacy endorsement. i would tell you earlier this week i did an ev
to undermine the president's advantage on foreign-policy. but i'm not sure there's much there. i'm not fully versed in everything about benghazi and the attack surrounding it, but it does seem like there's a lot of coverage out there from some of the largest news organizations in america. host: sandy is the october surprise. we'll see how this shakes out. ben in tennessee, independent caller. caller: please don't cut me off. i would like to say the bailouts of gm and chrysler benefited nascar, because they took all the money that the taxpayers gave them and put it back into nascar, because there were still sponsoring it and sponsoring events. also, this president does not carry ou -- does not care about the middle class. we have only had one rates on our social security. my mother got a $30 raise. it's going on four years now. he gets back in, we will not get another one. the only reason he gave this one was because of the election. host: reid wilson? guest: we actually put up an interesting post last week on the hot line by two republicans who took a look at consumer habits, how much they l
copy will not be festooned with all these post-it notes. as well as the politics and foreign policy editor at slate. he goes to the foreign newsmagazine and when he was the managing editor of foreign policy magazine counted twice won the award for general excellence, which i can tell you with a good feat in itself and particularly impressive given that foreign policy is a relatively small circulation journal, not a deep-pocketed magazines like "vanity fair" or "esquire." both articles and essays have appeared in "the new york times," "washington post" and "wall street journal" and his provide analysis for abc, cnn, msnbc and npr. he's in washington d.c. her very happy to have them with us here today. [applause] the dictators learning curve is a look at an arms race, speaking metaphorically that dictators and democratic activist trying to overthrow and both sides have had to up their game in recent years. for those of you who think foreign policy is about trade agreements, arms treaties come arcing border disputes, let me assure you it's a lively read a stun dobson's travels across t
cannot run from their record or positions. the last foreign policy debate, i was not sure whether governor romney was going to endorse president obama. [applause] we roman catholic say that boy had an epiphany. governor romney went from sank it was a mistake we did not leave 30,000 troops in iraq. he sounded like he was against the war from the beginning. i was amazed. he went from labeling russia last year as the single greatest geopolitical threats to the united states and even opposed the new gun control treaty that every republican said to push that, he said he would not have supported it. all of a sudden we can work with russia. you know that. did you hear that? i thought, turn that tv up. he is now putin's best friend. when as in the second debate what would you commit to, he said it depends. with these guys it depends on everything. it always depends who they're talking to or where they are. it depends on what the vote is. it always depends. [applause] i am from pennsylvania. the grandfather always said be aware of the convertists. one issue they cannot bring themselves to
on the cold war, including mining, classicking thes of american foreign policy in the post war era inspired me to do the same with the war. it was no easy task. books on the war built library shelfs, and you can go in and see. how could they say anything new about an event studied thoroughly? what i discovered was we knew very little what was happening in hanoi in the enemy's capitol. while historians wrote countless studies on american leaders, vietnamese counterparts, especially those in the north, received shockingly little attention. how do we know so much about the american side and so little about the vietnamese? it just so happens i entered graduate school when arian kyes from the former and present communist world opened doors. i attempted what previous historians could not, to tell the story in hanoi's eyes. i wanted to answer questions that eluded previous score lars. why was the struggle an international conflict, and how did they manage to defeat the strongest superpower the world had ever seen? talk about being in the right place at the right time. although it was difficult for ov
or positions. the last foreign policy debate, i was not sure whether president goingor romney was to endorse president obama. we roman catholic say that boy had an epiphany. governor romney went from sank it was a mistake we did not leave 30,000 troops in iraq. he sounded like he was against the war from the beginning. i was amazed. he went from labeling russia last year as the single greatest geopolitical threats to the united states and even opposed the new gun control treaty that every republican said to push that, he said he would not have supported it. all of a sudden we can work with russia. you know that. did you hear that? i thought, turn that tv up. 10putin's best friend. -- putin's best friend. when as in the second debate what would you commit to, he said it depends. with these guys it depends on everything. it always depends who they're talking to or where they are. it depends on what the vote is. pends.ays defe i am from pennsylvania. the grandfather always said be ists. of the convert tes one issue they cannot bring themselves to say they now agreed with us on was issues relati
.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year career. >> the military has great cadel lenni to respond. i would say that the military is much better suited to the emergency -- we have a terrific logistics capability. we have accumulated medical and medical related capability. >> we found of the decade of military and health challenges has spread many solutions particularly in the way we provide medical care to those wounded on the battlefield. >> we learn that
on the topic of foreign policy. most of his ideas he was a me, too. host: let's hear from our republican voters in new hampshire. caller: it is amazing that are all on the puck for president obama. you want to watch a balanced news station, go to fox news. that is the truth, it really is. president george bush would have been crucified if this went down in libya. for american soldiers, people that were killed. they were just sitting around. same situation. mitt romney does have a plan. he is a businessman. obama has never been run a lemonade stand. let's be honest. guest: with respect to benghazi the president is insisting on getting to the bottom. he has also said we will find those responsible and nature -- make sure they are held responsible. that is what we expect from are responsible president. with respect to the other comments, obviously with respect to fox news, i do not watch fox news, so i cannot really comment on fox other than to say it might be a good idea if our friends from kingston tried watching some other shows once in awhile to see what other folks are saying and not rely upo
of political reforms or two sides of the same coin. this is the syria way. very much foreign policy as well and elected by both sides of the fence. assad did his job well. he constructed an airtight array of family travel, sectarian-based patronage system that produced loyalties and stability. and as for my good friends in damascus wrote last year, he said quote, for the regime its supporters and its allies, syria is an amateur society, a positive with evidence both real and effective and generally blown out of proportion a series of sideshows violent and seditious proclivities that can be contained only by ruthless power structure, unquote ultimately bashar and his followers cannot trust anyone else in syria. is initial strategic vision for international respected and integrated syria became consumed by syrian paradigm of political survival. he was either unwilling or powerless to stop the response to perceived threats. he returned it to me typically authored touring mode of survival your and alawite fortress to protect, the various governments of syria that co-opted over the years to prot
or steel aspects from it -- emulate their engagement policy or steal aspects from a? >> there is not a perfect model. look at some of the work that is happening in india, for example, to try to attract foreign investment and entrepreneurs. i'm not sure -- it is still very early in terms of the results of their. for the last three decades, the u.s. has had, historically, a very healthy immigration policy, but in the last decade or so we have kind of gone the other way. when you think about it, the number of immigrants that have come in and built amazing companies and created jobs in the hundreds of thousands, we cannot be looking at other markets because there is not a perfect model, but we need to look back of the 1970's in the u.s. as an historical model. we have a lot of immigration. a lot of people came in with science, technology, engineering, mathematics backgrounds. if you look at silicon valley, you see the results. >> i spent seven years of my life painfully on the commission of immigration reform which was chaired by barbara jordan and 1990's. i think the wa
. the president is doing a loss to help that. with respect to foreign policy, i think that the record has been clear. i think this is a desperate act in a desperate campaign in the closing days to try to say that the president lied to the american people. i think that is not true, it is offensive to the good men and women who are neither democrats or republicans but get up and work for the national security of this country. host: what are you going to be watching for in your state on election night? guest: in wisconsin, is a unique blend. about to turn that your base democratic voters and make sure you are getting the votes from the swing voters, from the milwaukee suburbs or the green bay, across markets. we want to see big turnouts in the madison area. 20 to hold our own markets like green bay. is a swing market. i love wisconsin. is a fabulous state to watch politics and. to be a top state politically. but it is a great formula to put together a democratic victory. host: joining us from milwaukee, mike tate, wisconsin democratic party chairman. thank you for your time. >> tomorrow, molly ba
obama is, you know, he's the obviously the first and only black president he's policy an outsider in other really significant ways. he has a unusual name. he was largely grew up in foreign country. he, you know, he worked adds a community organizer with very poor people in a housing project until the south side of chicago. these are things that are extremely suspicious to lots of people in our country. and instead of talking about it doctor directly they use the other terms to code him to describe him as outer calling him a socialist. calling him a communist. these things that manifestly have nothing do with who he is. interest thing about barack obama, if you read his awe disty of hope, his memoir, if you look at the great speech the greatest moment it's about conciliation. this is what how he sees himself. this is an he did want to be a great president. he wanted to bid for greatness and by getting a grand bar iman. doing something bipartisan. he is born conciliators. that's who he is. the sad thing at the end of the day, the tragedy of barack obama is that he was a man who was
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)